The PR Coach

best social PR tips, resources & insight

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An American in ISIS’s Retweet Army

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The gradual radicalization of Douglas McAuthur McCain, we’re told, is reflected in his social-media timelines. This week, NBC News reported that McCain, a 33-year-old from Minneapolis and San Diego, had become the first American to die in Syria while fighting for the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), in clashes with other rebel fighters. (On Thursday, Fox News reported that a second American from Minneapolis may have been killed while fighting for ISIS in the same battle.)”Until early last year, a Twitter account linked to McCain included mostly mundane messages to friends about basketball—how the Lakers suck, comments about the Chicago Bulls—with only a few messages about Allah or Islam,” NBC noted. “Then the account went silent for more than a year.” McCain, who converted to Islam in 2004 and also appears to have used networks like Facebook and MySpace, fired up his feed again in mid-May—around the time that ISIS was publicizing its control over the Syrian city of Raqqa with public executions, and just weeks before the grouplaunched its military offensive in northern Iraq….
Jeff Domansky's insight:

The Atlantic looks at how the extremist group turns social networks into echo chambers


See on theatlantic.com

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How the Internet Saved Handmade Goods | Harvard Business Review

See on Scoop.it - Public Relations & Social Media Insight

A recent article in The Economist, citing the work of Ryan Raffaelli at Harvard Business School, points to what it calls a “paradox” in the aftermath of disruptive innovation. Some old technologies, after being rendered obsolete by better and cheaper alternatives (indeed even after whole industries based on them have been decimated), manage to “re-emerge” to the point that they sustain healthy businesses. Think mechanical Swiss watches, now enjoying strong sales. Or fountain pens, or vinyl records. Or small-batch, handmade goods — from vermouth to chocolate to pickles.We could add our own favorite example: pinball. In our HBR article “Big Bang Disruption”, we describe the devastation of arcade pinball machines wrought in only a few years by Sony’s PlayStation home video console. From a historic high in 1993 of 130,000 machines sold, sales fell over 90% in the next five years. By the end of the decade, only one producer—Stern Pinball—was left making new machines, and with arcades closing daily, it looked as if it, too, would soon be facing game over….
Jeff Domansky's insight:

The Internet. The same technologies that destroyed them brought them back.


See on blogs.hbr.org

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The War for Our Digital Future: Virtual Reality vs. Integral Reality | WIRED

See on Scoop.it - Public Relations & Social Media Insight

Like most people I spend much of the day digitally connected, gazing at screens that make my life and work more interesting and productive. In this troubling scenario, the only reality we might experience will be artificial simulations inside helmets or goggles that prevent us from touching, seeing, feeling or interacting with a real person or object.Fortunately, there’s an alternative digital future taking shape that I call Integral Reality, which combines the best of the digital and analog worlds. Integral Reality intertwines the wonders of the digital within the physicality of real things. With digital components embedded and invisible within objects, Integral Reality won’t separate us from the real world but instead promises to create emotionally engaging experiences with it….
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Exploring integral reality and how that compares to virtual reality. Thought provoking reading for your long weekend.


See on wired.com

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Ten ways communication is changing

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Charting the rise of tech-infested communications – from pheromone parties to NarbsPublic scrutiny has tunneled hard on the shallowness of contemporary communication, as depicted in Nicholas Carr’s aptly-named 2010 book The Shallows. Carr writes passionately about humanity’s dwindling attention span, and rightly so – the internet has changed the way we handle information, and the gap between generations, especially regarding activities we deem “social” and entertaining, is only growing more pronounced. Perhaps because of the mind-numbing nature of pop culture’s online lingua franca – memes – general consensus seems to indicate that the internet has had a detrimental effect on our attention spans. This is thanks to mechanical factors like hyperlinks, gifs, embedded video content, and other pretty things that help to add flavor and aesthetics to what would otherwise be a dry information dump. It’s no longer sufficient to convey a message – the message has now become inextricably linked to the medium so much that the latter now obscures the former.Through no fault of their own, the Carrs of the world don’t address the the bold, unrefined new forms of communication that evade categorisation: superdialects, extrasensory communication, and straight-up biotech developments that push our cognitive and linguistic potential into the realm of science fiction. Yes, it sucks that the printed word is threatened by the new frontier of interactive media, but in an ideal world, the two don’t need to be mutually exclusive realms. Technology has simply expanded the tools we have at our disposal, and frankly, we’re all for modular means of everyday communication that allow for nonsense and idiocy. Let’s take a look at ten communication trends on the horizon…
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Stimulating reading and exploration of ideas. Highly recommended 10/10


See on dazeddigital.com

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The scientific A-Team saving the world from killer viruses, rogue AI and the paperclip apocalypse

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They don’t look like Guardians Of The Galaxy-style superheroes…. The porter’s lodge is like an airlock, apparently sealed from the tribulations of everyday life. But inside the college, pacing the flagstones of what is called – all modesty aside – Great Court, are four men who do not take it for granted that those undergraduates actually have a future. They are the four founders of the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk (CSER), and they are in the business of “horizon scanning”. Together, they are on alert for what they sometimes call “low-probability-but-high-consequence events”, and sometimes – when they forget to be reassuring – “catastrophe”….
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Guardian profile of the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk (CSER) and its founders is highly recommended training for those who love Futurism science fiction and plain old good storytelling. Recommended reading 11/10 ;-)


See on theguardian.com

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4 Branded Content Lessons From a Content Cancellation

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In his new column for Chief Content Officer Magazine, Andrew Davis is dishing out content marketing advice to unsuspecting targets — whether they want it or not. …Put your top hat back on and bring back Top Hat Tuesday Tips.Seriously. I want it back.For 22 weeks, your awesome video production, marketing, and distribution tips arrived like clockwork in my email inbox. Thanks to the Wistia team, I learned how to record better audio, how to frame a nice shot, and where to embed my videos for maximum impact. You taught me how to “circle back,” do a “rip take” and even how to make my own teleprompter with just a laptop and a chair.I’ve learned so much from your weekly deliveries of video content that I want them back. I’ll even pay for them. (That’s Youtility.)….
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Andrew Davis shares an important lesson from a content marketer’s shift its strategy and will likely lose many of its key audience.


See on contentmarketinginstitute.com

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Pt 2: 1 Introducing the Teams: How PR Is Organized at 3 Infinite Loop

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Unlike Microsoft, Samsung, Adobe, cellular carriers, or Wal-Mart-sized corporations, Apple handles its PR and Communications strategies wholly in-house, mirroring its control over its hardware and software strategies. While Apple still works with external agency Media Arts Lab of TBWA on print, digital, and TV marketing efforts, it is actively reducing its reliance on that firm by boosting its in-house marketing resources. According to sources, Apple is “aggressively” poaching select members of Media Arts Lab for its in-house team, but not undertaking a full-on corporate raid.Though Apple is a gigantic and ever-growing company, its PR and Communications group is surprisingly tiny. There are only around over 30 PR employees in Apple’s Cupertino offices, with another few dozen-some individuals scattered around the world to organize events, translate press releases, and either answer or dodge questions from journalists in every time zone. The Cupertino-based office is a wing on the third floor of Apple’s Product Marketing building, 3 Infinite Loop. Framed posters of vintage Apple advertisements decorate the area, which otherwise consists of plain white hallways with offices on either side, and two small common areas….
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Essential reading for PR and marketing teams curious about how Apple succeeds.


See on 9to5mac.com

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Free Technology for Teachers: Five Good File Conversion Tools

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Even though I create nearly all of my documents online and use cloud storage services that support a multitude of file formats, there are still a few occasions when someone sends me a file that I need to convert. If your school is not using Google Drive, Dropbox, or a similar cloud service, you may find yourself and your students in need of a file conversion tool too. A more common need for a file conversion tool arises when we start to work with audio and video files. Here are five good online file conversion tools….
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Essential for your social media toolbox


See on freetech4teachers.com

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Apple Has Considered $400 Price for Wearable Device

See on Scoop.it - Wearable Technology Insights

Pricing has yet to be finalized for the forthcoming product, which is expected to begin shipping next year. Sources say consumers should expect a range of prices for different models including lower priced versions.It is not immediately clear if the price will be settled in time for Apple’s Sept. 9 press conference when it is expected to introduce the new iPhones and announce a wearable device. Apple declined to comment.The introduction of a wearable product would mark Apple’s first entry into a new device category since the 2010 introduction of the iPad. As with tablets, Apple aims to redefine an existing, albeit young, category currently populated by Jawbone and Fitbit, which make fitness bands, and other smartphone makers Samsung, LG, Motorola and Timex, which have waded into the burgeoning smart watches business….
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Apple’s high-end wearable will be among the most expensive of the category. I think consumers will pay the price if the design meets Apple’s usual high standards.


See on recode.net

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Mobile Marketing: 15 Steps to Build a Mobile Marketing Plan that Zooms Results!

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The modern consumer of today is mobile, social, savvy and smart. Your online and mobile platforms must be able to serve them what they need and want from you how and when they need it.Take a listen to this episode of the Social Zoom Factor episode for 15 steps to build your mobile marketing strategy and plan. I share with you tips, strategies and best practices to help you integrate, create amazing user experiences and drive real business return on your investment. It’s not just about developing a pretty mobile website or application, but instead about how you can develop and launch an integrated platform that serves the needs of your customers and help you achieve your goals and objectives….
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Good overview of mobile marketing.


See on business2community.com

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7 Inspiring Lessons from 2014’s Top Content Marketers

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One of the best ways to learn about the content marketingindustry is to study what others are doing. Over the past three years, it’s been our pleasure to observe the field and, more specifically, identify those who are making us think about successful content marketing in new ways.Today we are excited to announce the finalists for the Content Marketer of the Year, each having already received the following recognition in their individual categories…
Jeff Domansky's insight:

Great content marketing lessons and inspiration. Recommended reading 9/10


See on contentmarketinginstitute.com

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How to Succeed on Instagram: An Informal Case Study - Kruse Control Inc

See on Scoop.it - Public Relations & Social Media Insight

…While Facebook is usually the best platform to start your Social Media marketing (because it’s the biggest and Facebook ads can’t be beat for generating traffic, leads and sales), there will soon come a time that you’ll want to venture out into the other channels. Instagram is ideal for many businesses and it can be very confusing, especially if you aren’t a regular user. The results (re: ROI) you get are a direct consequence of a winning (or losing) content strategy.I have a client who’s been able to quickly get the results they wanted and I’d like to share some of the simple yet profound actions they took to get there. Like so many other endeavors, it’s not so hard once you know what you’re doing….
Jeff Domansky's insight:

If you want to know how to succeed on Instagram for your business, you must tell your story through images. Here’s how a 100-year old year old business gets great results.


See on krusecontrolinc.com